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Pandora. You are not allowed to touch that jar. No matter what!
—Prometheus

Epimetheus, formerly known as Keeper of the Jar of Evil is a Mount Othrys character in Hesiod and Homer's myth. He débuts, with his appearance in around 700 B.C. and usually ends at around the 9th Century.

Epimetheus is the greek titan keeper of the jar of evil in Greek Mythology.

HistoryEdit

Epimetheus is a titan, the son of Iapetus, also the younger brother of Prometheus, Menoetius and Atlas. Epimetheus teamed up with the Olympians to help take down the titans along with his older sister, Menoetius and older brother, Prometheus and a few other titans. His older brother, Atlas unfortunately led the titans into attack.

According to Plato's use of the old myth in his Protagoras (320d–322a), the twin Titans were entrusted with distributing the traits among the newly created animals. Epimetheus was responsible for giving a positive trait to every animal, but when it was time to give man a positive trait, lacking foresight he found that there was nothing left.

Prometheus decided that mankind's attributes would be the civilizing arts and fire, which he stole from Zeus. Prometheus later stood trial for his crime. In the context of Plato's dialogue, "Epimetheus, the being in whom thought follows production, represents nature in the sense of materialism, according to which thought comes later than thoughtless bodies and their thoughtless motions."

According to Hesiod, who related the tale twice (Theogony, 527ff; Works and Days 57ff), Epimetheus was the one who accepted the gift of Pandora from the gods. Their marriage may be inferred (and was by later authors), but it is not made explicit in either text.

In later myths, the daughter of Epimetheus and Pandora was Pyrrha, who married Deucalion, a descendant of Prometheus. Together they are the only two humans who survived the deluge.

FamilyEdit

 
 
 
 
 
 
Chaos
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Unknown Mother
 
Iapetus
 
Cronus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Atlas
 
Prometheus
 
Epimetheus
 
Menoetius
 
 



Notes:

  • Solid lines denote parent-child blood relationships
  • Dashed lines denote marriage relationships that result in offspring
  • denotes the deceased
  • Iapetus and Epimetheus' mother were never married.

TriviaEdit

NotesEdit

  • Epimetheus means 'afterthought.'
    • Which means he wasn't very smart.

Production NotesEdit

  • Epimetheus has the least amount of appearances of all the characters.

AppearancesEdit

AboutEdit

  • Epimetheus was married to Pandora.

ReferencesEdit