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The goddess of love and beauty
—Homer

Aphrodite is a character in Hesiod and Homer's myth. She débuts, with her appearance in around 700 B.C. and usually ends at around the 9th Century.

Aphrodite is the greek Goddess of love and beauty in Greek Mythology.

HistoryEdit

Aphrodite is usually said to have been born near her chief center of worship, Paphos, on the island of Cyprus, which is why she is sometimes called "Cyprian", especially in the poetic works of Sappho. However, other versions of her myth have her born near the island of Cythera, hence another of her names, "Cytherea". Cythera was a stopping place for trade and culture between Crete and the Peloponesus, so these stories may preserve traces of the migration of Aphrodite's cult from the Middle East to mainland Greece.

In the most famous version of her myth, her birth was the consequence of a castration: Cronus severed Uranus' genitals and threw them behind him into the sea. The foam from his genitals gave rise to Aphrodite (hence her name, meaning "foam-arisen"), while the Erinyes (furies), and the Meliae emerged from the drops of his blood. Hesiod states that the genitals "were carried over the sea a long time, and white foam arose from the immortal flesh; with it a girl grew." The girl, Aphrodite, floated ashore on a scallop shell. This iconic representation of Aphrodite as a mature "Venus rising from the sea" (Venus Anadyomene[20]) was made famous in a much-admired painting by Apelles, now lost, but described in the Natural History of Pliny the Elder.


Petra tou Romiou ("The rock of the Greek"), Aphrodite's legendary birthplace in Paphos, Cyprus. In another version of her origin, she was considered a daughter of Zeus and Dione, the mother goddess whose oracle was at Dodona. Aphrodite herself was sometimes also referred to as "Dione". "Dione" seems to be a feminine form of "Dios", "of Zeus", the genitive form case of Zeus, and could be taken to mean simply "(she) that belongs to Zeus" in a generic sense. Aphrodite might, then, be an equivalent of Rhea, the Earth Mother, whom Homer relocated to Olympus. Athena, Hestia and Artemis are the three virgin goddesses whose "hearts" Aphrodite could not affect.

FamilyEdit

URANUS †---------------------------------------------------------------------------GAIA

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CRONUS †---------------------------------------------------------------------------RHEA

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HESTIA___DEMETER___HERA___HADES___POSEIDON___ZEUS___URANUS' GENITALS †

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                                                               APHRODITE

Notes:

  • Solid lines denote parent-child blood relationships
  • Dashed lines denote marriage relationships that result in offspring
  • denotes the deceased
  • Sorry for the closeness of the 6 names of the children

TriviaEdit

NotesEdit

  • Aphrodite did have consorts / lovers... and many!
    • She would constantly cheat on her husband Hephaestus, with the god of war, Ares.

AppearancesEdit

ReferencesEdit